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Lusterware platter

by Anonymous / Unknown

Medium
Glazed earthenware
Dimensions
Height: 2 1/4 in (5.7 cm); diameter: 19 in (48.3 cm)
Credits
San Antonio Museum of Art, Gift of Mrs. Brooke F. Dudley and Mrs. Charles Best, 99.33. Image courtesy of the San Antonio Museum of Art; photo by Joel Salcido
Location
San Antonio Museum of Art

16th century

Trunk

by Anonymous / Unknown

Medium
Chip carved wood and iron
Dimensions
Height: 24 1/2 in (62.2 cm); width: 64 in (162.6 cm); depth: 19 in (48.3 cm)
Credits
San Antonio Museum of Art, Gift of Peter P. Cecere, 2006.1.98. Image courtesy of the San Antonio Museum of Art; photo by Alayna Barrett Fox
Location
San Antonio Museum of Art

19th century

Platter

by Anonymous / Unknown

Medium
Earthenware with tin glaze
Dimensions
Height: 3 1/8 in (7.9 cm); diameter: 15 in (38.1 cm)
Credits
San Antonio Museum of Art, Gift of the Estate of Ellen M. Slayden, 26.1328. Image courtesy of the San Antonio Museum of Art; photo by Joel Salcido
Location
San Antonio Museum of Art

17th century

Our Lady of Guadalupe

by Anonymous / Unknown

Medium
Polychromed wood
Dimensions
Height: 41 1/2 in (105.4 cm); width: 21 1/2 in (54.6 cm); depth: 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm)
Credits
San Antonio Museum of Art, Gift of Roberta S. McCrary, 85.32.a-e. Image courtesy of the San Antonio Museum of Art; photo by Ansen Seale
Location
San Antonio Museum of Art

20th century

Our Lady of the Pillar

by Anonymous / Unknown

Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
Unframed: 42 x 31 3/4 in (106.7 x 80.6 cm); framed: 51 x 41 1/2 in (129.5 x 105.4 cm)
Credits
San Antonio Museum of Art, Purchased with funds provided by the Ford Motor Company, 2000.19. Image courtesy of the San Antonio Museum of Art; photo by Ansen Seale
Location
San Antonio Museum of Art

18th century

Our Lady of Guadalupe

by Anonymous / Unknown

Medium
Oil on copper
Dimensions
Unframed: 14 x 11 in (35.6 x 27.9 cm); with frame: 23 1/2 × 20 1/2 × 3 1/2 in (59.7 × 52.1 × 8.9 cm)
Credits
San Antonio Museum of Art, Purchased with funds provided by Ford Motor Co., 2000.40. Image courtesy of the San Antonio Museum of Art; photo by Ansen Seale
Location
San Antonio Museum of Art

18th century

Bowl

by Anonymous / Unknown

Medium
Earthenware with tin glaze; copper, cobalt, and iron in-glaze decoration
Dimensions
Height: 5 1/2 in (14 cm); diameter: 9 1/2 in (24.1 cm)
Credits
San Antonio Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. Ric Bradford, Houston, Texas, 2012.34. Image courtesy of the San Antonio Museum of Art; photo by Peggy Tenison
Location
San Antonio Museum of Art

18th century

Pyxis

by Anonymous / Unknown, circa 950–975

Medium
Elephant ivory
Dimensions
Overall: 4 5/8 x 4 1/8 in (11.7 x 10.5 cm)
Credits
The Cloisters Collection, 1970.
Location
The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met)

10th century

Column or Columnar Support with Three Apostles: Matthew, Jude, and Simon

by Anonymous / Unknown, circa 1125–1150

Medium
Marble
Dimensions
116.3 x 27.5 cm (45 13/16 x 10 13/16 in)
Credits
Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Gift of The Republic of Spain through the Museo Arqueologico Nacional and Professor Arthur Kingsley Porter
Location
Harvard Art Museums

12th century

Camel

by Anonymous / Unknown, circa 1129–1134

Medium
Fresco transferred to canvas
Dimensions
Overall: 97 x 53 1/2 in (246.4 x 135.9 cm)
Credits
The Cloisters Collection, 1961.
Notes
First half 12th century (possibly 1129–34)
Location
The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met)

12th century

Abacus of Capital from the Abbey of Santa María de Lebanza

by Anonymous / Unknown, circa 1185

Medium
Limestone and mortar with red paint
Dimensions
64 x 64 x 50.5 cm
Credits
Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Friends of the Fogg Art Museum Fund
Location
Harvard Art Museums

12th century

Vidal Mayor

by Anonymous / Unknown, circa 1290–1310

Medium
Tempera colors, gold leaf, and ink
Dimensions
Leaf: 36.5 × 24 cm (14 3/8 × 9 7/16 in)
Notes
By unknown artist/maker, Vidal de Canellas (Spanish, active Aragon, Spain 1236-1252), and probably Michael Lupi de Çandiu (Spanish, active Pamplona, Spain 1297-1305). In 1247, with the reconquest of Spain from the Muslim forces virtually complete, King James I of Aragon and Catalonia, Spain, decided to establish a new systematic code of law for his kingdom. He entrusted the task to Vidal de Canellas, bishop of Huesca. The Getty Museum's manuscript, the only known copy of the law code still in existence, is a translation of Vidal de Canellas's Latin text into the vernacular Navarro-Aragonese language (in that language, the book is called Vidal Mayor in reference to the author). The manuscript's scribe was Michael Lupi de Çandiu, who identifies himself in an inscription and who also may have translated the text. Not only is the text an important historical document but it is luxuriously illuminated with hundreds of historiated and decorated initials. Although written and illuminated between 1290 and 1310 in one of the major urban centers in northeastern Spain, the elegant style of the painting reveals an intimate link with contemporary French illumination. This stylistic connection demonstrates the increased movement of both artists and manuscripts from one European court to another.
Location
J. Paul Getty Museum

14th century

Saint John the Baptist

by Anonymous / Unknown, circa 1740

Medium
Charcoal, heightened with opaque white watercolor
Dimensions
43 × 26.9 cm (16 15/16 × 10 9/16 in)
Credits
Purchased with funds provided by the Disegno Group.
Notes
After Juan Conchillos Falcó (Spanish, 1641-1711). On striking blue prepared paper, this academic figure study is posed as Saint John the Baptist. Seen from below, suggesting that the model stood on a raised platform, the saint looms large. The artist modeled his figure using the blue as a middle tone. Charcoal and white watercolor forcefully articulate the anatomical form of the saint, and convey his powerful presence. The saint's musculature is dramatically portrayed in gritty black lines built up in bold succession. The summary treatment of the drapery, executed in broad, jagged strokes, gives the saint's clothing an abstract quality that reiterates the drawing's primary purpose as a study of the male body. On close examination, the charcoal's rough texture reflects glints of light, creating a seamless marriage between medium, technique, and subject.
Location
J. Paul Getty Museum

18th century

Portrait of a Woman

by Anonymous / Unknown, circa 1800

Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
14 15/16 x 11 1/8 in (38 x 28.2 cm)
Credits
Acquired by Henry Walters with the Massarenti Collection, 1902
Location
Walters Art Museum

19th century

Oil Jar

by Anonymous / Unknown, circa 1900

Medium
Earthenware with glaze
Dimensions
Height: 13 in (33 cm); diameter: 9 in (22.9 cm)
Credits
San Antonio Museum of Art, Gift of Peter P. Cecere, 2006.1.55. Image courtesy of the San Antonio Museum of Art; photo by Peggy Tenison
Location
San Antonio Museum of Art

20th century

Oil Jar

by Anonymous / Unknown, circa 1900

Medium
Earthenware, slip, and metal
Dimensions
Height: 14 1/2 in (36.8 cm); width: 9 1/4 in (23.5 cm); depth: 9 1/2 in. (24.1 cm)
Credits
San Antonio Museum of Art, Gift of Peter P. Cecere, 2006.1.54. Image courtesy of the San Antonio Museum of Art; photo by Peggy Tenison
Location
San Antonio Museum of Art

20th century

Butcher's Shop Sign

by Anonymous / Unknown, circa 1910–1920

Medium
Iron with cloth-wrapped wire
Dimensions
Height: 34 in (86.4 cm); width: 121 in (307.3 cm); depth: 18 in (45.7 cm)
Credits
San Antonio Museum of Art, Gift of Peter P. Cecere, 2014.17. Image courtesy of the San Antonio Museum of Art; photo by Benjamin McVey
Location
San Antonio Museum of Art

20th century