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18th century

Artworks 1 to 10 of 31:

Bowl

by Anonymous / Unknown

Medium
Earthenware with tin glaze; copper, cobalt, and iron in-glaze decoration
Dimensions
Height: 5 1/2 in (14 cm); diameter: 9 1/2 in (24.1 cm)
Credits
San Antonio Museum of Art, Gift of Dr. Ric Bradford, Houston, Texas, 2012.34. Image courtesy of the San Antonio Museum of Art; photo by Peggy Tenison
Location
San Antonio Museum of Art

Our Lady of Guadalupe

by Anonymous / Unknown

Medium
Oil on copper
Dimensions
Unframed: 14 x 11 in (35.6 x 27.9 cm); with frame: 23 1/2 × 20 1/2 × 3 1/2 in (59.7 × 52.1 × 8.9 cm)
Credits
San Antonio Museum of Art, Purchased with funds provided by Ford Motor Co., 2000.40. Image courtesy of the San Antonio Museum of Art; photo by Ansen Seale
Location
San Antonio Museum of Art

Our Lady of the Pillar

by Anonymous / Unknown

Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
Unframed: 42 x 31 3/4 in (106.7 x 80.6 cm); framed: 51 x 41 1/2 in (129.5 x 105.4 cm)
Credits
San Antonio Museum of Art, Purchased with funds provided by the Ford Motor Company, 2000.19. Image courtesy of the San Antonio Museum of Art; photo by Ansen Seale
Location
San Antonio Museum of Art

The Entombment of Christ

by Luisa Roldán (La Roldana), circa 1700–1701

Medium
Polychrome terracotta
Dimensions
Overall: 19 1/2 × 26 × 17 in (49.5 × 66 × 43.2 cm)
Credits
Purchase, several members of The Chairman’s Council Gifts, Walter and Leonore Annenberg Acquisitions Endowment Fund, private donors; The Bernard and Audrey Aronson Charitable Trust Gift, in memory of her beloved husband, Bernard Aronson; Anonymous Gift and Louis V. Bell Fund, 2016.
Location
The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met)

Saint Paul the Hermit

by Juan Alonso Villabrille y Ron, circa 1715

Medium
Polychromed terracotta
Dimensions
24 x 30 x 18 1/2 in (61 x 76.2 x 47 cm)
Credits
Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Museum purchase thanks to a gift from Jo Ann Geurin Thetford in Honor of Dr. Luis Martín, MM.2013.01. Photography by Dimitris Skliris.
Location
Meadows Museum

Saint John the Baptist

by Anonymous / Unknown, circa 1740

Medium
Charcoal, heightened with opaque white watercolor
Dimensions
43 × 26.9 cm (16 15/16 × 10 9/16 in)
Credits
Purchased with funds provided by the Disegno Group.
Notes
After Juan Conchillos Falcó (Spanish, 1641-1711). On striking blue prepared paper, this academic figure study is posed as Saint John the Baptist. Seen from below, suggesting that the model stood on a raised platform, the saint looms large. The artist modeled his figure using the blue as a middle tone. Charcoal and white watercolor forcefully articulate the anatomical form of the saint, and convey his powerful presence. The saint's musculature is dramatically portrayed in gritty black lines built up in bold succession. The summary treatment of the drapery, executed in broad, jagged strokes, gives the saint's clothing an abstract quality that reiterates the drawing's primary purpose as a study of the male body. On close examination, the charcoal's rough texture reflects glints of light, creating a seamless marriage between medium, technique, and subject.
Location
J. Paul Getty Museum

Presentation of Christ in the Temple

by Vicente López y Portaña, circa 1745–1746

Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
22 × 15 in (55.88 × 38.1 cm)
Location
LACMA

Plaque depicting Jacob choosing Rachel to be his Bride

by Alcora Ceramic Factory, circa 1755

Medium
Faïence (tin-glazed earthenware)
Dimensions
Object (height x width): 94 × 47.6 cm (37 × 18 3/4 in)
Notes
Clad in complementary yellow and blue, a young man and woman coyly eye each other, their hands meeting at the very center of the scene. Lively, overflowing foliage serves as a dramatic and fitting backdrop to this courtship. At the base of the plaque, an inscription in Latin that identifies the pair translates as: Behold the very beautiful Rachel with her sheep, whom Jacob chooses as his wife. After painting by Jacopo Amigoni (Italian, 1682-1752). Despite the inscription, the scene also includes several details from the biblical account of Rebecca and Eliezer at the well. The jar balanced on the well, the flamingolike camels in the background, and the jewel-laden chest in the foreground are elements of this story. The plaque is based on a mid-seventeenth century image of Rebecca and Eliezer by Jacopo Amigoni, whose paintings and engravings often served as a model for the decoration of plaques and tapestries. It is likely that the painter of the plaque had a print of Amigoni's work in hand but transformed it into the more amorous Jacob and Rachel subject, probably for a specific patron.
Location
J. Paul Getty Museum

Christian Gospels in Arabic for Sundays and Feast Day

by Francisco Canes, 1758

Medium
Hand painted manuscript
Dimensions
10 1/2 x 7 3/4 in. (26.7 x 19.7 cm)
Location
Harn Museum of Art

The Virgin Annunciate (recto); Sketch of a Figure (verso)

by Francisco Bayeu y Subias, circa 1769

Medium
Black chalk with touches of white (recto); black chalk (verso)
Dimensions
47 × 31.5 cm (18 1/2 × 12 3/8 in)
Location
J. Paul Getty Museum