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19th century

Artworks 1 to 10 of 29:

Trunk

by Anonymous / Unknown

Medium
Chip carved wood and iron
Dimensions
Height: 24 1/2 in (62.2 cm); width: 64 in (162.6 cm); depth: 19 in (48.3 cm)
Credits
San Antonio Museum of Art, Gift of Peter P. Cecere, 2006.1.98. Image courtesy of the San Antonio Museum of Art; photo by Alayna Barrett Fox
Location
San Antonio Museum of Art

Portrait of a Woman

by Anonymous / Unknown, circa 1800

Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
14 15/16 x 11 1/8 in (38 x 28.2 cm)
Credits
Acquired by Henry Walters with the Massarenti Collection, 1902
Location
Walters Art Museum

Portrait of the Marquesa de Santiago

by Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes, 1804

Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
Unframed: 209.9 × 126.7 cm (82 5/8 × 49 7/8 in.) Framed: 235.3 × 150.2 × 9.5 cm (92 5/8 × 59 1/8 × 3 3/4 in)
Notes
The Marquesa de Santiago strikes a commanding presence, confronting the viewer directly with her hand assertively on her hip. She stands in front of a landscape of gently sloping hills dotted with cottages made up of rough, tan brushstrokes. Her sheer white lace mantilla veil extends to her knees and she holds a closed fan in her left hand, both traditional accessories of Spanish women in the 1700s and 1800s. The Marquesa was known to wear bold makeup, enough that her acquaintances wrote about it, and here, heavily applied rouge, powder, and lipstick accentuate her features. While other portraitists of this time often flattered or idealized their sitters, Francisco Goya frankly captured the Marquesa’s appearance and confident personality. The Marquesa, María de la Soledad Rodríguez de los Ríos Tauche, grew up the only child of a well-connected family in Madrid, eventually inheriting the three noble titles of her parents and the wealth that came with those. Married first in 1783 when she was eighteen, then again in 1790 after she was widowed, María was the one who brought greater wealth and status to her husbands. She had estates in Flanders and Spain, two million reales in capital (the Spanish currency used from the 1300s to 1860s), and two million more in silver, jewelry, and other possessions. This portrait, though painted as a pair to her second husband’s, unconventionally touts her own title, Santiago, in the inscription in the lower right, rather than his, San Adrían, which would have been typical for her to adopt as his wife. As the more elite of the couple, she may have decided to commission these portraits from Goya to add to her family’s substantial paintings collection.
Location
J. Paul Getty Museum

Doña Francisca Vicenta Chollet y Caballero

by Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes, 1806

Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
Overall: 40 1/2 in x 31 7/8 in
Credits
Norton Simon Art Foundation
Location
Norton Simon Museum

General Nicolas Philippe Guye

by Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes, 1810

Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
Unframed: 41 3/4 x 33 3/8 in (106.05 x 84.77 cm); framed: 52 1/4 x 43 3/4 in (132.72 x 111.13 cm)
Credits
© Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Photo by Travis Fullerton
Location
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

One can't look (No se puede mirar), from The Disasters of War (Los Desastres de la Guerra)

by Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes, circa 1810–1814

Medium
Etching
Location
John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

Seated Giant

by Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes, circa 1818

Medium
Burnished aquatint, scaper, roulette, lavis (along the top of the landscape and within the landscape)
Dimensions
Plate: 11 3/16 × 8 3/16 in (28.4 × 20.8 cm); Framed: 21 3/4 × 19 in (55.2 × 48.3 cm)
Credits
Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1935.
Location
The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met)

Portrait of Don Juan Antonio Cuervo

by Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes, 1819

Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
Framed: 136.8 x 105.1 x 7.3 cm (53 7/8 x 41 3/8 x 2 7/8 in.); Unframed: 120 x 87 cm (47 1/4 x 34 1/4 in.)
Location
Cleveland Museum of Art

Modo de Volar (A Way of Flying) from Los Proverbios series

by Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes, 1820

Medium
Etching and aquatint on wove paper
Dimensions
Image: 8 1/2 x 12 3/4 in (21.59 x 32.385 cm); Sheet: 13 3/8 x 19 3/8 in (33.9725 x 49.2125 cm)
Location
Allentown Art Museum

Danza de Gitanos

by Camino, 1850–1888

Medium
Albumen silver print
Dimensions
Image: 20.5 × 26.2 cm (8 1/16 × 10 5/16 in); mount: 25.4 × 31.5 cm (10 × 12 3/8 in)
Notes
A man playing guitar in a circle with a group of women who are dancing or playing tambourines. The group is next to a large wooden cross at the base of a mountain.
Location
J. Paul Getty Museum