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Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida

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The Young Amphibians

by Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, 1903

Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
37 7/8 × 51 3/8 in (96.2 × 130.5 cm)
Credits
Purchased with the W. P. Wilstach Fund, 1904
Location
Philadelphia Museum of Art

20th century

The Blind Man of Toledo

by Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, 1906

Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
24 1/2 x 36 1/2 in (62.2 x 92.7 cm)
Credits
Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Museum purchase, The Meadows Foundation Fund with private donations, MM.03.01. Photography by Kevin Todora.
Location
Meadows Museum

20th century

Seven-Peaks, Guadarrama

by Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, 1906

Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
62.23 x 97.79 cm (24 1/2 x 38 1/2 in); framed: 81.28 x 117.79 x 8.26 cm (32 x 46 3/8 x 3 1/4 in)
Credits
Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Gift of Archer M. Huntington, Class of 1904
Location
Harvard Art Museums

20th century

María at La Granja

by Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, 1907

Medium
Oil
Dimensions
67 1/8 x 33 1/2 in (1704.98 x 850.9 mm)
Location
San Diego Museum of Art

20th century

Pepilla and her Daughter

by Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, 1910

Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
Unframed: 181.6 × 110.5 cm (71 1/2 × 43 1/2 in); framed (Display): 200.7 × 129.5 × 10.2 × 8.3 cm (79 × 51 × 4 × 3 1/4 in)
Notes
Handsome and proud, Pepilla sits with one arm around her daughter's shoulders and her other hand on her hip. Both mother and daughter gaze directly out at the viewer. Just as the mother's gesture tenderly protects yet presents her daughter, Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida expressed tenderness in his portraits of Spanish people, particularly women and children. With his typical spontaneous, broad brushwork, Sorolla reveled in the effects of the warm Mediterranean light and air on the colors and patterns in the women's costumes. He preferred to paint even portraits outdoors, trying to achieve a spontaneous effect. "[N]o matter how much labor you may have expended on the canvas, the result should look as if it had all been done with ease and at a sitting," he said in 1909.
Location
J. Paul Getty Museum

20th century

Drawing in the Sand

by Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida, circa 1911

Medium
Oil on canvas
Dimensions
21 × 25 1/4 in (53.34 × 64.14 cm)
Credits
Milwaukee Art Museum, Gift of the Samuel O. Buckner Collection M1919.30. Photo by Larry Sanders
Notes
Although sometimes associated with the Impressionist and Symbolists who painted at the same time, Sorolla remained independent of a specific art movement. At the same time, he created some of the most modern paintings of the early 20th century. A 1909 solo show in New York featured 356 of his paintings and introduced him to an American audience. Touted as “the Spanish painter of sunlight and color” by the New York Times, 169,000 visitors attended the show in about a month. He was soon given a commission for a series of murals celebrating traditional life in Spain for the Hispanic Society of America, which he painted between 1911 and 1919. Milwaukee was at the forefront of Sorolla’s popularity in America. “Drawing in the Sand” was a gift to the Milwaukee Art Institute in 1911 from its early president, Samuel O. Buckner (Catherine Sawinski, Assistant Curator of European Art)
Location
Milwaukee Art Museum

20th century